mindful eating

Today i realized, I’m unsure what to do. Do I take the chance of being buried next? Or rather do I try to help others in that position?

The simple answer would probably be to help others and not be selfish. But eating disorders get the best of so many people. You believe you can do both, then wind up dead. That’s the harsh reality of it, sorry.

My ED is such a selfish bastard. “Oh, your mom made you a nice dinner? Wrap it up and throw it away.” If you find someone hiding their food, seek help.

Sometimes mindful eating can be helpful when trying to enjoy a meal with family. Focus on every sense:

  • Sight – What shape is it?
  • Smell – Does it smell good?
  • Touch – Does it have a texture?
  • Taste – Is it sweet?
  • Sound – Is it crunchy?
  • This was a coping method i learned in a hospital that helps to ground yourself. If you try it, let me know if it works for you! If not, what’s your favorite coping skill?
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    overcoming anorexia

    I was first diagnosed with an eating disorder in 7th grade. Now, I’m a senior so I’ve had my fair share of not only recovery but also relapsing. If you don’t know what anorexia nervous is, check out my blog post on it by clicking here.

    My life with eating disorder has been like a rollercoaster, super up and down. Literally, my weight will go up as I get healthier, then suddenly start dropping again when I relapse. This not only effects your physical health, but also your mental health.

    Signs of “ED”:

    • Hiding/Getting Rid of Food
    • Wearing Baggy Clothing
    • Coldness
    • Weight Loss
    • Dizziness
    • Depression/Anxiety
  • Eating disorders, also referred to as “ED”, are extremely dangerous, and the first step to recovery is admitting that you have a problem– it’s true. I used to believe the way I saw my body really was the way other people saw it, later I found out it’s body dysmorphia that causes me to see myself as overweight. But anorexia is not just about wanting to be skinny and have the perfect body. In my case, one of the underlying issues of my anorexia is needing control over something in my life.
  • It doesn’t stop there though. There are many other reasons as to why people develop eating disorders, such as using food restriction as a coping mechanism.
  • I guess the best term to use here would be that “voices” begin to develop in your head after a while, telling you to restrict, to throw up, that you’re fat, to exercise. Maybe you can still feel the hunger, but you listen to the voices anyways. You think they’re true, so you listen.
  • You need to be stronger than ED to recover, which is hard because it weakens you so much. You need to KNOW you’re sick and WANT to get better. The process is very difficult, especially in the beginning, but it gets easier with time. Even when you reach a healthy weight, you may still feel urges and get negative thoughts in your head. The illness does not just “disappear”. Lots of people end up living with some symptoms of an eating disorder for the rest of their lives. Also, eating disorders can permanently affect your body in different ways.
  • Thanks for reading guys. If you think yourself or someone you know might have an eating disorder, seek help immediately.

    Eating Disorder Hotline: 1-800-931-2237